Posts Tagged ‘strip patterns’

The SAQA Online Auction Begins Tomorrow!

Thursday, September 14th, 2017

“Whirlwind”,  2017.    12″ x 12″ ,  30.5cm x 30.5cm

Tomorrow, September 15th, is the first day of the annual SAQA Online Benefit Auction.  This year, for the first time, this first day is Diamond Day, on which every quilt offered for auction this is for sale at $1000 per piece – a wonderful opportunity for one of my collectors to secure this piece, “Whirlwind”!  Diamond Day opens at 2.00pm Eastern Time USA, tomorrow, September 15th – which is 22 hours from now as I write.

If it’s unsold on Diamond Day, my quilt will be offered 18-24 September in Section 1  (scroll to row 3) There are some wonderful pieces in this section, so as it’s a reverse auction, don’t linger indecisively too long! Anyone, anywhere, can participate.  For more information on how to purchase a quilt in the auction go to Bidding guidelines and FAQs

Alluring Lines

Saturday, August 27th, 2016

posted previously on a great design workshop I attended nearly a year ago in the Wool Museum at Geelong, Australia, with fibre artist Jan Mullen. Photos I took of various activities that day included this and several others of pages of a huge wool fabrics sample book lying open on a table.  This morning, while mulling over a request for information and images of most most significant innovative works had me looking back through photos and information sheets to select a few key works of mine to include in a submission to SAQA for possible inclusion in a book.  Of course, looking back takes time, as it is soooo easy to be distracted 🙂 and I could have my stuff half assembled by now; but revisiting these photos in the files compelled me to resize and post some, shown below.

 

wool sample sheets 1 blog

This morning I revisited those photos of lovely lines and printed this particular one to pin on my wall to look at whenever I walk past.

Wool samples file NWM geelong1

These others are inspirational, too, though for the moment they’re not getting a page of their own on the pin board.

Followers know that I adore  fine freehand cutting and piecing, and I can feel some of that coming on in a way I haven’t quite dealt with it before. To me, the line is the single most important design element, and that includes the expressive potential of the glorious straight stitch.

Segmented Designs 3

Thursday, May 19th, 2016

Today I found these photos of paths, taken about ten years ago in New Zealand, reminding me I’ve had a thing for mosaic/segmented designs for quite a while.mosaics 2 blog

Brick mosaic pathways, New Zealand 2006.

And really, when you think about it a lot of patchwork designs are a bit like mosaics, aren’t they?  With that thought, I looked further in the old files and came up with a few –

mosaic like blog

 

I also noticed this blast from the past, “Hidden Messages”,  which hung only once at a solo exhibition I had in Perth, Western Australia, 1997.  I have no recollection of what the hidden messages were ;-0  but might remember if it was in front of me, perhaps.  It was not one of my greats, and yet finding it today gave me pause to think about it again …

hidden messages blog

Hidden Messages, 1997.     86cm  x 120 cm

 

Segmented Designs

Wednesday, May 4th, 2016

Three years ago in the Denver Botanic Gardens I took this pic of this lovely path in one part of the garden, printed it out and have had it up on my pinboard on and off for ages, feeling I had ‘to do something’ about it.

mosaic path DBG blog

Mosaic style pathway, Denver Botanic Gardens.

More recently I’ve discovered fabulous installation hangings by Christine Mauersperger whose simple stitch designs I’ve always loved, and buzzing around somewhere in the depths for several years has been some of the work by Olga de Amaral one of whose beautiful hangings stopped me in my tracks in the foyer of the Hotel Santa Clara, Cartagena, Colombia.

On the weekend I found some bits of metallic finished leather that were surplus to several pieces I made in the Tracks series.  Well, I ‘found’ them when the biodegraded bag they were in fell to bits in my hands and they cascaded to the floor.  In the Tracks quilts, leather pieces were laboriously hand stitched from behind to the base fabric, which was then quilted.  It was hard on the hands and won’t do anything more that way.  For some reason just then a lightbulb came on – leather snipped into bits and machined onto base fabric could make a mosaic-like surface.   Heartened by a quick sample, I realised it would make a good 12″ square piece for the SAQA Auction – so here it is completed.  Two layers of fabric were torn to size and bonded together with fusing web; then the machine applique using gold metallic thread was also in effect the quilting (through two layers of fabric)  The leather pieces stopped at the rough edge – no binding or other finish was necessary or imho appropriate.

Mosaic quilt blog

12″ quilt for SAQA Online Auction September 2016.       Full view left, detail right.

While working on that I had other ideas, and today fiddled a bit with slivers of mylar-backed ripstop nylon- left side of this pic –

Mosaic samples blog

Samples – mylar/nylon left,   metallic leather right

I bought several metres of this mylar/nylon, about 150cm wide, @$2/m, in the cheapo fabric zone of Santiago de Chile, several years ago, mainly because I can’t resist glitter and would have bought gold, too, if they’d had it, and also I guess because it was a cheap challenge.  The piece I have in mind will make a slight dent in it, and I could also use the mylar as a base fabric…goodness, I’ll have that stuff used up in no time!

Lines- Seams Waiting To Happen

Tuesday, March 22nd, 2016

I’ve previously blogged about my approach to planning  http://www.alisonschwabe.com/weblog/?p=1010  and in that particular post used a collage of diagrams on pages from it:

Collaged sketch book pages

One was a snippet from a diagrammatic sketch of a man wearing heavy outdoor clothing featuring a fisherman’s rib neck on his sweater.  I saw it in some ad in an Aussie newspaper back in about 1995, and clearly remember it but can’t find the actual pic.  It inspired me to sketch the pattern of knitting and the use those lines and shapes in a commissioned quilt for a book “Quiltskills” 1997, published by the Quilters Guild of NSW.  Each chapter featured particular skills useful to contemporary quiltmakers, illustrated by a quilt made especially to go with the article.  Mine was chapter 2, Irregular Shapes.

Anyway this morning I found a very old and poor image of that quilt, Waterweave”,  the colour of which somehow seems stuck at ‘too green’ but anyway I’ve put it alongside that line diagram to show how for me a basic diagram can lead to an actual quilt.  Its typical of my planning that I work things out as I go, and usually know when its time to stop.

Waterweave quilt and sketch blog

 

As a student and then teacher of geography, illustrating whatever I’m talking about with a simple diagram is what I naturally turn to, so my designs in fabric and thread tend to develop from that kind of mark making, too, and I’ve mentioned before that I see almost any line as a seam waiting to happen.
Translate »
%d bloggers like this: