Archive for the ‘binding options’ Category

Two New Collectors

Sunday, October 3rd, 2010

It’s always a joy when someone wishes to exchange their hard earned money for some of my art. Since I enjoy creating and making textile and fibre art I don’t think of it as ‘work’, even though it is, and as ‘work’ is occasionally frought with difficulty or stress even, between concept and completion.  Today I am hoping that my two newest collectors will have many years of enjoyment with my works in their collections.

This week I was pleased to see my 12″ square in the online 2010 SAQA Benefit Auction was purchased by a collector in the USA, Francie Gross.  I am embarrassed to say I forgot to photograph it before sending it off, but it is in the style of Timetracks 11

  a portion of which is shown here.

It is still up on the auction pages, 2b, at the SAQA online auction which enters its third week this week with the works shown on pages 3a and 3b – just click the link on the page above the pics andyou will go to each in turn.  Perhaps you’ll make a bid for some of the interesting pieces still to come under the hammer in the next few days.

A few weeks ago I sold two works to an international collector, a personal friend, who chose “Timetracks 16” and also this one:

 

It’s not shown in my website, partly because I haven’t ever decided just which category it belongs in, or exactly what name to settle on it.  For a long time it went as ‘Untitled’ which I always think is an artist’s cop out. 

Yet it is an important work, because it took me into the “Desert Tracks” works that followed and will probably be added to over time. It is a work focused on those aspects of the traditional ancestors of modern art quilts that appeal to me and appear repeatedly in my own work – blocks/units, repetition, and hand quilted surface patterning.  The finished edges are applied with a gold metallic fabric, double layered and cut on the cross, left ufinished – also from a time when I was beginning to consider less conventional bound edgings on my work, and burned edges appeared soon after making this one.  It has always looked good in local exhibitions here, and I know it will be well placed in  its new home.

It just occurred to me that someone with some clout in the art world should declare a day each year to be designated “International Art Collectors’ Day”.  I still have the very first painting I bought, nearly 55 years ago with 8s 6d of the 12s pocket money I was given to spend at the annual school fete.  It is a postcard-size watercolour of a landmark mountain range in northern Tasmania where I grew up, and I remember choosing it from a whole table of perhaps 50 or so little watercolured landscapes, probably done by the art teachers at the school, and certainly framed by one of the parents’ framing business – handy use for the their framing offcuts, probably!  It’s still in the original frame – I think I will do it the honour of having it framed in a more modern frame next time I’m back in Aus – I have always loved it.  In addition my parents had several watercolours painted by a cousin of my father’s, John Nixon Gee.  Dad took me along to JN’s house one morning when I was maybe 6, and I remember watching him paint a little while I was there.

French Binding Tutorial

Wednesday, February 27th, 2008

I learned this many years ago from a book “Happy Endings” by Mimi Deitrich – and it has become a favourite method for finishing off a quilt. Any kind of quilt -bed quilts, wall quilts, anything. It is durable and good looking.

It is suitable for all rectangular works, and very slightly irregular works without any extreme edge shapes – only gentle inward or outward curves. The binding is joined to form one long piece before applying.

These instructions plus tips from my experience are for a fine binding (about 1cm or less) on a quilt using a medium or low loft batting. You apply it when the quilting is finished, and I use a walking foot for best results, no matter though if you don’t have one – just handle carefully.

Cut and join sufficient 2 and 1/4″ strips to equal the quilt’s circumference plus at least 10″. Press joining seams open, then fold the strip in half and press the fold tip I like to make sure one edge can just be seen peeping out from under the other – this ever-so-slightly wider half is the one that goes against the front of the quilt, and by doing this you make sure both edges are totally sewn in, because I use a narrow seam allowance to sew down the strip onto the front of the quilt – approx 3/8″, that is, not quite the widest needle setting to the right of centre on my machine.

Lay the quilt out absolutely flat on a table, and leaving a few inches of binding strip hanging free, and beginning about 10″ from a corner, put in one pin, then tip just check to make sure that as you go round the quilt no join in the strip will fall at a corner – and reposition /adjust with a new seam if one does. Now pin the rest of the first edge in place, (with pins across the seam line) right up to the point where the seam allowance intersects the seam line for the next side, and stop, turn 45 degrees and stitch out to the corner, UL.

Remove the work and fold the strip sort of envelope style as in the pic UR Pin this next side up to the interesection of the seam line with that of the next side, and stitch, changing direction 45 degrees right at the end again. LL

 
The pic at LR shows what the back will look like as you hand stitch the folded edge down – see the rest of the directions accompanying the next photo:

Anatomy of a Commission – Day 12 – Binding – Auditions in Progress

Saturday, March 17th, 2007

At the beginning, in the planning stages and initial working stages of a wall quilt, I never make any hard and fast decision on binding (a) whether to do it or not, and (b) which fabric I will use if I do. The growth of the piece during construction can change the final outcome to the point where what you envisaged at the start somehow doesn’t really apply so strongly any more – all the colours, shapes and their ratios to each other being part of that, I guess.

This is the first of several pics I have taken over the past hour or so, in order to come to a final decision about which fabric to use – my client prefers a binding, and I agree this piece will be enhanced by one.

The following couple of pics show some of the choices I am considering, although what ever I do it will be a narrow, about 1/2 inch binding, not a great swag of fabric that appears of some along some of the sides. Interestingly, the one I have always favoured, with a lot of black but all of the quilt’s other main colours in the rather wild stripey design, has gone in and out of favour as I try other possibles. In this photo, one I thought would be great, on the left hand side as you look, somehow has a deadening effect on all the colours. The one on the right which I love is totally wrong, too pink. The stripe, lower right hand edge is a serious contender, but the one along the top edge, a spot with varicoloured background, is also very seriously in the running.

Posted by Picasa

Saturday, March 17th, 2007


In this pic, the varigated spot shows favourably along the top, the purple a bit boringly down the right side, the hot tomato colour interestingly along the left. A couple of different strips just visible along the bottom – on the left lower edge is the stripe with lots of black and other main colours from the quilt in it (one of the 3 original ones I was considering), and I am still thinking about this one. The one on the other side isn’t at all suitable, although sometimes one of those wild cards come up trumps. Posted by Picasa

Saturday, March 17th, 2007


In this pic, the varigated spot shows favourably along the top, the purple a bit boringly down the right side, the hot tomato colour interestingly along the left. A couple of different strips just visible along the bottom – on the left lower edge is the stripe with lots of black and other main colours from the quilt in it (one of the 3 original ones I was considering), and I am still thinking about this one. The one on the other side isn’t at all suitable, although sometimes one of those wild cards come up trumps. Posted by Picasa

Translate »
%d bloggers like this: