Posts Tagged ‘tetrahedrons’

Tetrahedrons In Transit

Wednesday, May 11th, 2016

All three pieces I entered in Wangaratta Art Gallery’s Petite Miniature Textiles Biennial Exhibition 2016 were accepted, and I’m happy to say are now on their way to Australia.  The Exhibition opens on June 4th and runs through until 17th July.   All entries had to be within 30cm x 30cm x 30cm.  I love miniature textile works and would love to see this popular biennial show.  If you’re in the northern Victoria area over that time, you can go to http://www.wangaratta.vic.gov.au/recreation-leisure/art-gallery/visiting-gallery.asp for gallery times and other information.

Wave blog

‘Wave’  2016.   18cm x 18cm x 18cm x 15cm.  Soft sculpture.

FairyBread blog

‘Fairy Bread’  2016.  18cm x 18cm x 18cm x 15cm.  Soft sculpture.

Morse blog
‘Morse’  2016.  18cm x 18cm x 18cm x 15cm.  Soft Sculpture.

How did I come up with their names?  That’s always fun and is sometimes a challenge.  Any Aussie will get the Fairy Bread one – non-pareils, aka in Aus as “100’s and 1000’s” are sprinkled over thin slices of buttered fresh bread cut into triangles – a mandatory item on any kid’s birthday party menu.  When I took these pieces to my wonderful photographer, Eduardo Baldizan, I hadn’t yet named the other two, and he used ‘Wave’ and ‘Morse’ to identify the pics of each one when sorting their files – and I loved those choices, so they stayed.

With the three pieces, each18cm x 18cn x 18cm x 15cm, plus the weight of the box and paper to stop them rattling around, the total weight of the parcel was only 0.4kg   They’re light as a feather.  My regular followers recall I blogged about their development first here, then and finally.  Others made since these have been in colours other than cream – and the other day it occurred to me it might be a good idea to Scotchguard (r)  these, so I hope that helps to keep them pristine.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tetrahedrons, Continued…

Tuesday, March 8th, 2016

This one is almost ready to sew up and I  thought I’d document a couple of steps with pics –

inside a tetrahedron blog

1) Showing the back/inside of the structure, where knots anchor the thread as it goes to the front.

black stitching blog

2)  Three of the triangles sewn together to provide the one working surface.

black and white ready to sew up blog

3)  When the stitching is finished, the final side seam is closed and the base sewn on.

I have done several now, and am enjoying making them.  In the next group I will do surface design before covering the template pieces, to see how that goes – probably some combination of paint and stitch – ideas for which are coming far faster than my ability to make them!  I may have some thinner batting somewhere and may replace batting with a couple of layers of cotton fabric – I learn something or tweak a detail on each one, but this is probably the last how-to on them, though  I have no idea where this 3D quilted textile art will go from here.

 

 

3D Covered Objects -Tetrahedrons

Tuesday, February 23rd, 2016

Yesterday I began covering enough equilateral triangles to make 4 tetrahedrons, and I just finished #16 this afternoon. As I tidied the work area gathering up the threads and snippets, I heaped the triangles into a neat pile,  and it struck me how much these cream triangles looked like sandwiches or cut bread!  So I set them on a plate for a pic or two – Tetrahedron sandwiches 2 blog

Starting from the lower RH corner, the next pic shows template plastic with cream fabric machine sewn to one side and trimmed;  heat activated batting triangles glued to triangular shapes of cream fabric; and finally the edges hand sewn in place all round a triangle shape.

Tetrahedrons sandwiches blog

So if you want to try them yourself, you have all the knowledge you need, except to practice slip stitching the edges together in such a way that very little stitching shows – use matching thread+skill.  OR one could make the stitching up each join part of the surface decoration.

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