Posts Tagged ‘lines’

A Boring View?

Sunday, June 21st, 2015

Yes, seated opposite this chest height window the view is boring, unremarkable, barely worth a glance; but turning to the left,  I can see a past the receptionist’s desk through sliding glass doors to a patio with glass balustrade overlooking the SE part of the city.  From all the treatment rooms there is a gorgeous panoramic view of Montevideo from about Pocitos, with Parque Rodo in the foreground and around to  Buceo in the distance and the River Plate stretching beyond which is great – as that’s where the patient does spend more time, after all.window waiting room 1 blog

 

I’ve been here many times, but the other day I ‘saw’ something I hadn’t ‘seen’ before – it wasn’t the clear graded sky. but that interesting edge formed by the building profile, as featured  here-window view blog

 

 

Finally, the cables are gone and its been fiddled with in other ways to reflect what I am thinking about in relation to that edge, and the subtle textures on the walls.  If ‘do’ something with it there may even be something textural that ‘grades’ the ‘sky’ area.  Maybe not – and the proportions might vary – but its tthat edge that grabs me…window waiting room edited  blog

Just as well I always have a camera with me, as I never know what I will come across to pop into this visual diary!

 

 

There’s Nothing Like a Bit of Scrap Bag Diving!

Sunday, May 24th, 2015

I keep a large bag of small scraps., principally offcuts from projects.  When I’m clearing up after finishing something, anything worth keeping goes into the large clear plastic bag on the floor beside my sewing table.  The bag being clear helps, just a little, when I’m looking for something in particular, as I was this morning.  I needed more earthy colours to add more shapes to the current Bungle Bungles piece I’m working on, you may remember.

earthy colours

Relatively speaking, piecing like this uses as much fabric in seams as shows on the front.  When I’m doing pieced work, I use a large variety of different fabrics in small amounts; and nothing is cut out in advance, its all cut freehand and sewn seam by seam in the technique known as ‘improvisational piecing’. The Ebb&Flow quilts in particular are assembled in this way with a lot of scrap bag diving along the way –

SCRAP BAG  Ebbs and Flows

 

 

Needing more of some fabrics including some of those little one-offs that add spice, I took a deep breath and began scrap bag diving – well, turned it all out on my table, and started sorting though, selecting things I can use, and putting most of it back into the bag.

SCRAP BAG archeology

SCRAP BAG  save all yellows

I carefully save all offcuts of every yellow, partly because although I rarely buy any yellow fabric, a touch of a yellow value here and there in every piece of art, whatever the medium, is vital, literally giving life to the work. The more valuable the fabric/colour, the smaller amount I am prepared to save…. and the smallest piece of a strong almost acid yellow I came across this morning was barely 3cm x 1cm!

SCRAP BAG  save yellow

This piece of yellow with airbrushed red and blue is gradually running out – so its very precious. I have about  3cm x 4cm left of a fat 1/4 bought years ago from Deb Lunn in Denver.

 

SCRAP BAG good grief

This morning I realised scrap  bag diving is rather like archeology, digging down though the past – and like archeology, it throws up some puzzles, of which this is one!  I don’t remember putting it together, but these are definitely my fabrics, and all sewn together by me, for sure – but why?  I certainly don’t remember anything in which this sequence appeared.  It’s a nice yellow in that striped print, though….

 

SCRAP BAG elegant snippets

I really don’t remember the work these offcuts came from – they were trimmed off after the gold stitching along each place the cream meets the print…. quite elegant, really, and I may do something more in these gentle neutrals soon. With gold stitching/quilting.

 

 

 

SCRAP BAG extra units CynthiaSCRAP BAG raided block

I often work in repeat units – and always make a few extra to get the best possible result when juggling them at the assembly stage. From ‘Cynthia’s Quilt’ top, and ‘New Directions’ below, come these ‘spares’ which have useful sized pieces – and the raiding has already begun on the lower ‘block’.  The fabric in that block terminating in the triangle/arrow head is destined for salvaging for use in the next set of strip assemblies I need to put together; I only ever had a small amount of it and I’m down to last few square centimetres…

 

SCRAP BAG one glove

And finally, much to my delight, virtually at the bottom of the heap, I found one of the pressure gloves I’ve been missing for a while, since last spring really….so then I had to tip it all out again and go through more carefully to find the other.   And sure enough, it was there.  The weather’s getting cool again, and some days now my hands are feeling a bit in need of pressure on the arthritic joints – so this find was timely and welcome!.

Bungle Bungles Series

Tuesday, May 5th, 2015

What I read about the structure of what’s inside these intriguing landforms took my attention.  So, I thought another in this series would feature the layered limestone and conglomerates using fine pieced strips in beige-cream/off white tones, surrounded by a solid band of brown to signify the outer and inner colours determined by the structure.  This outer colour is due to the tiny spaces in the stone being colonised by cyanobacteria which give earthy browns and golds to the outer few millimetres, and this deepens when the rocks have been rained upon.  Inside the rock remains white and nearly white/cream tones.

The time consuming work was the piecing. so when I’d done enough, I set the shapes I’d cut into the solid colours, darker to go to the front/nearest the viewer so to speak, thinking some sense of depth might result, and in a primitive way I think that’s been successful.  You’d think I’d have been able to work out that the black and white spotted fabric for the background just is not IT, though –

Bungle Bungles 4 blogbut, having just written that I am having second thoughts…..

  • I am not sure now if I will finish this off and quilt it etc, and it might remain a sample or study for something larger.
  • Then again, I could take the shapes out and re-set them in black – and might sometime when I’ve thought more about it.
  • I’m not sure about more cream piecing – but then again,
  • I could do cream cut-out shapes with machine stitched bands on them signifying the layered structure….

However – and here’s the reminder I periodically give about the value of making samples and small studies: this leads  the creative mind onward,  and I now have in mind something, perhaps two pieces, of much larger work.  After all, the BungleBungles are massive …. so with this in mind, there’s a considerable piecing I feel I will need to do now.  So some of this b/w dots plus some b/w print of work by a prominent Aboriginal artist designer, printmaker and painter, the late Jimmy Pike  have gone into a strong bath of black tea to tone down the white:

BungleBungles tea dyed blog

Many of Jimmy Pike’s beautiful linear patterns were reproduced on commercially available fabric and used in clothing principally I think under the Desert Designs label – having been away from Aus for so long I’m not sure what’s now available now, though.

 

Bungle Bungles 3 – Quilting

Tuesday, April 28th, 2015

With the piecing all done, and layers in place, this afternoon I began the quilting  treatment.  Double lines of gold stitching have begun to appear on the piece, and I’m not sure where that will lead, and some of it might be black, but there is a fair bit more quilting required.  This is an area about 4″ x 5″.

Bungle Bungl;es 3 detail 2 blog

 

The dots I used on the fist piece are really too big for the shapes on this one, and so the bits of glitter provided by gold stitching seem to fit better with the smaller scale shapes.

Bungle Bungles, 3

Thursday, April 23rd, 2015

 

This afternoon I have been piecing – that is, cutting out different shaped pieces of fabric and sewing them together, which I know puzzles many bystanders around those of us who make ‘patchwork’ things including quilts.   Fabric is just a raw material to some textile artists, and thus no different from a skein of wool, a tube of oil paint,  a block of wood or stone, all to be worked by people with appropriate skills.  I’ve always loved sewing, and love piecing as a technique for surface design, which produces contemporary patchwork that despite appearances does in fact have connection with the traditional geometric patterned designs that most people think of as ‘patchwork’.  Patchwork, traditional and contemporary, is often backed with a layer or two of fabric and quilted by hand or machine to hold it all together in a completed object, usually bedding or clothing for warmth.

piecing #2

 

This pictured segment continues some piecing I began a couple of weeks ago, before undergoing surgery for a shoulder prosthesis.  My doc did say use the hand as much as possible, and this activity is well within the restrictions – of holding nothing heavier than a cup of tea, and not to try to raise the arm above shoulder level – well just now I can’t get it anywhere near the shoulder so there’s no danger there.  All the newly constructed left arm has to do is some gentle holding of small pieces of fabric as the machine slowly sews, and my other (good) arm whips out the pins, flying back and forth from the pin cushion as the machine gradually sews around the curved edge.  It’s all rather like setting in a sleeve.  Even as I was doing this today, a brainwave came for another piece in this theme, inspired by what I read recently about the structure of the sandstone karst formations in the The Bungle Bungles.   So as soon as I finish putting all these pieces together, I’ll start another to incorporate my new idea.  However, right now its time for a change of activity to include arm swinging and shoulder shrugging followed by a cup of tea.

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