Posts Tagged ‘lines’

Edges and Holes 2

Sunday, November 29th, 2015

Workshop Follow-up

Saturday, November 7th, 2015

The carding strap was the object that I really focused on in the workshop –

carding strip blog

for its lovely spiral shape and lines.  Earlier this week I cut some stencils of the spiral shapes, and today did some fabric and thread samples, some of which I photographed.  I added a couple of the cut and paste exercises I did in class, and assembled these  into a collage to show the variety of possibilities I have been thinking about so far.

NWM workshop follow up samples blog

 

Freehand Or Improvisational Piecing – The Basics

Sunday, July 26th, 2015

 

detail, Ebb and Flow 2

I’m quite often asked how to go about improvisational or freehand (template free) cutting and piecing which has become very widespread  among quilt makers in the past 25 years- a modern tradition really.  Widely used by art quilt makers who piece their designs, and seen in quite a number of Modern Quilts, it’s all rotary cut and machine pieced.   The following basic instructions contain all you need to know to begin, as I only learned it from watching a short demonstration by Nancy Crow at the start of a several day long workshop, and then plunging in to using it straight away. It enabled us to rapidly get through heaps of exercises in her class on design and colour.  I’ve been enjoying this way of piecing ever since.

basics of improv

 

Hand piecers could use this just once,  perhaps, to make some wayy lines in the one direction  but it really is a machine technique,  even if you’re pretty speedy, as hand sewing won’t allow for more complex cutting, re-arranging, inserting slivers and so on.

Freehand or ‘improvisational piecing’ has become a modern convention – and once you recognize it, you’ll see it wherever there are pieced art and non-traditional quilts.   Elsewhere on this website are two galleries of my original quilts made between about 1990 and the present –  the Color Memories gallery followed chronologically by the Ebb& Flow gallery.  Keep in mind that have been piecing this way for over 20 years, but I too began with these simple instructions way back then.   With practice, you too will be able to achieve more complex constructions if you wish.

Basics of improv blog image

The main things to remember are:

  • to place both fabrics right side up
  • without built-in seam allowances, as you cut and sew each fabric shape its area showing on front becomes progressively smaller – so start out larger in anticipation. Experience will tell you how much to allow, but, if you run short somewhere on a side you can always add another piece as quilters traditionally have !
  • in addition to getting smaller, so, too, the edges become progressively more irregular. Resist your trimming urges until you have finished ALL the piecing.   When you do get round to trimming, discard tiny pieces but keep anything useful – small bits also piece up into lovely freeform mosaics you could use for appliqued or printed designs – see Judith Trager’s work among others for some good examples.

Alicia Merrett ‘s YouTube videos, are good in a very precise, controlled way –but, they were pitched to careful traditional quilters, but even so, you might find them helpful.    In the Nancy Crow class where I learned this piecing, we had a lot of colour and design work to get through in the time, and Nancy showed us these basics that enabled rapid working.  We put all rulers away and did no pinning, just putting edge to edge and sewed.  Some managed this better than others in the workshop; and at home I found my own way of working which includes periodic dots along the cut edges with permanent marker or other pen/pencil/chalk – and even more of these in tight curves.    I usually pin every few inches, more in tight curves –  but it all depends…. there are no right ways to do this, and only one correct result – a flat one.  Once you have learned the basics, experience will teach you whatever you want to know next – think it, try it.  And, if you ever need my advice or help, feel free to contact me through this website.

 

The Bungle Bungles Series Continued…

Thursday, July 16th, 2015

Kimberley Dreaming choices made, layered_edited-1

So the question I was considering in the last post was whether to go with the plain fabric domes or the one colour with the black/gold pinspot  – see the top part of this collaged image.   I decided to go with the one colour with gold pinspot.  There’s a panel of gold pinspot below the shapes, and then more black. I’ve layered and begun quilting, and while I do this bit, I am considering whether the previous one in the series, now bound and fitted with sleeves, needs gold dots or not – because, once started, there will  be no going back … that gold paint is  really permanent!

 

A Boring View?

Sunday, June 21st, 2015

Yes, seated opposite this chest height window the view is boring, unremarkable, barely worth a glance; but turning to the left,  I can see a past the receptionist’s desk through sliding glass doors to a patio with glass balustrade overlooking the SE part of the city.  From all the treatment rooms there is a gorgeous panoramic view of Montevideo from about Pocitos, with Parque Rodo in the foreground and around to  Buceo in the distance and the River Plate stretching beyond which is great – as that’s where the patient does spend more time, after all.window waiting room 1 blog

 

I’ve been here many times, but the other day I ‘saw’ something I hadn’t ‘seen’ before – it wasn’t the clear graded sky. but that interesting edge formed by the building profile, as featured  here-window view blog

 

 

Finally, the cables are gone and its been fiddled with in other ways to reflect what I am thinking about in relation to that edge, and the subtle textures on the walls.  If ‘do’ something with it there may even be something textural that ‘grades’ the ‘sky’ area.  Maybe not – and the proportions might vary – but its tthat edge that grabs me…window waiting room edited  blog

Just as well I always have a camera with me, as I never know what I will come across to pop into this visual diary!

 

 

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